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Standard Liquor Pour: Standard Shot, Cocktail & Jigger Pours

November 27, 2019
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Scott
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Sticking to standard liquor pours and standard wine pours can lower pour costs, improve liquor inventory control, make your bar remarkably profitable. Below, read all about what a standard liquor pour is—in rocks pours, using jiggers, pouring shots, and when making cocktails. We'll also cover standard whiskey and champagne pours to round it out.

What Is a Standard Liquor Pour?

A standard pour is what is typically provided to guests at bars and restaurants when liquor or champagne is ordered. Its size depends on the type of alcohol and drink ordered. It’s typically 1.5 fluid ounces for 80 proof liquor and 4 fluid ounces for champagne. In a fifth of alcohol—the most common alcohol bottle size—there are about 17 shots.

How Many Ounces Is a Standard Pour of Liquor?

A standard liquor pour at most bars across the U.S. is 1.5 ounces. Most. There are some notable exceptions. Some larger corporate establishments pour 1.25 ounces, while some higher-end establishments with complex signature cocktails will pour 2 ounces.

Also, if you order a drink neat or on the rocks, you’ll get a rocks pour. This is also a good way to practice how to upset, Which is a good way to practice how to upsell, by the way.

What Is a Standard Rocks Pour?

When liquor is ordered neat or on the rocks, it’s a 2-ounce pour.

This is for two reasons. The first is that the liquor is the only liquid in the glass, so you get a little more of it. To avoid looking like you’re sipping on a shot. The second is that neat and rocks drinks tend to be for top-shelf liquors that people savor. The experience is more about enjoying the liquor than enjoying a mix that masks it.

What Is the Standard Pour in a Single Mixer Cocktail?

Most single-mixer cocktails take 1.5-ounce liquor pours. Unless the bartender likes you, they say.

What is a Standard Shot Pour?

A standard shot, like a standard cocktail, is 1.5 ounces of liquor.

How Much Liquor Is in a Double?

The standard pour for a double is 3 ounces, which is two standard 1.5-ounce liquor pours.

Standard Pour on a Jigger

A standard jigger is 1.5 ounces on its large side and 3/4 ounces on its small side. So, if you're using the large end of a jigger to make a drink, your pour will be 1.5 ounces.

Jiggers are the little hourglass-shaped measuring tools that countless bartenders use. By having volume aligned with standard liquor pours, jiggers take all the guessing out of pouring and make sticking to standard pours and keeping variance and pour cost low easier. The alternative to using a jigger is free pouring.

Standard Whiskey Pour

How Many Ounces Is a Pour of Whiskey?

Like other liquors, a standard whiskey pour is 1.5 ounces for shot, 2 ounces for a neat or rocks pour, and 3 ounces for a double.

What Is a Standard Whiskey Pour in ml?

In millimeters, the standard whiskey pour is 44 ml for a shot or cocktail, 59 ml for a neat or rocks pour, and 88 ml for a double.

Standard Champagne Pour

What Is a Serving Size of Champagne?

The standard serving size of champagne is 4 ounces. Champagne pours are a bit smaller than other pours because champagne is carbonated. If the glassware has a lot of surface area, the bubbles will fizz out too quickly. So champagne needs smaller glasses which necessitates a smaller pour.

What Is a Standard Champagne Pour?

Most champagne glasses and flutes hold 6 ounces. To ensure you’re hitting the standard 4-ounce champagne pour, fill the glass two-thirds of the way up.

How Many Glasses Are in a Bottle of Champagne?

A standard 750 ml bottle of champagne is 25.3 ounces. Given that a standard champagne pour is 4 ounces, there are about 6 glasses of champagne in each bottle.

Those Are the Standard Liquor Pours

Now you’ve got an understanding of standard pours for liquor and champagne. And hopefully a little context that explains why some pours are different than others.

One great thing about training bar staff on standardized pours is the prevention of over-pouring. Over-pouring plays a big part in a bar’s variance and, ultimately, a calculating pour cost and bar profitability.

Consistently and accurately taking your inventory is how to calculate your bar’s variance and isolate what types of alcohol are being over-poured. And if you use a liquor inventory software like BinWise Pro, taking bar inventory and calculating variance are fast and automated.

If you’re at all concerned with over-pouring and how it affects your variance and bar profitability, then book a demo. Let one of our experts walk you through exactly how BinWise Pro will help. The only thing you have to lose is more alcohol.