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9 Bar Manager Duties: A Bar Manager Job Description

November 25, 2019
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BinWise Staff
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A bar manager or supervisor wears many hats. They know their bar inside out. They’re shrewd businesspeople. They’re empathetic people managers. It’s a complicated job that takes an impressive set of skills and a bar management guide can come in handy. So we asked the bar managers we know for the bar manager duties they think are most important. And here they are!

Let’s take a look at what bar managers do and how many hours they typically work.

What Does a Bar Owner, Bar Manager, or Bar Supervisor Do?

The simple answer is that a bar owner or bar manager supervise all the business aspects of a bar. Of course, some bar owners take more of a backseat. They’ll invest in the bar initially, then let the bar manager run the day-to-day operations.

The duties of a bar supervisor are managing inventory, hiring, training, and overseeing staff, maintaining a budget, managing operations, conducting marketing, bar promotion, and driving sales.

Bar Manager Job Description

If you’re writing a bar manager job description or applying for a bar manager position, focus on all 9 of the following bar manager duties.

Manage Inventory

One of, if not the, most important things a bar manager does is decide what beverages to order based on what’s been sold. Then negotiate contracts with suppliers to buy those beverages. This process is called bar inventory management. Done consistently and accurately, it gives bar managers a look into what drinks are most popular and what drinks are most profitable. Those are two important things to know if your goal is to be a popular, profitable bar.

Most bar managers will either use a bar inventory spreadsheet to take inventory manually or automate the process with liquor inventory software. Depending on how busy the bar is, this task can be done either daily or weekly. In either case, bar managers shouldn't wait until an item runs out completely to order more. Whether they choose to take inventory themselves or assign other staff with the task, it is ultimately the bar manager’s responsibility to ensure that the bar is always fully stocked.

Hire, Train, and Oversee Staff

A bar manager is responsible for hiring bar staff and building the team. While the bar manager doesn’t train new hires, they choose the trainers and direct the creation of all the bar staff training materials.

Once staff is in the door and trained up, a bar manager oversees their work every shift. That means the bar manager has written the schedule, assigned stations, and prepared the staff for the upcoming shift.

At the same time, a good bar manager must focus on the staff’s growth. It's on them to have relevant learning materials and resources available for staff to continue their professional development. For example, you could encourage (and possibly even pay for) employees interested in wine to take the Introductory Sommelier course. Which is one of the four sommelier certification levels.

Lead by Example

A successful bar manager understands that they are not simply managing their staff, they're leading them. They establish leadership is by setting examples through their own behavior and decision making. From bussing tables to bartending, a manager should happily roll up their sleeves and get on the front lines. With energy and enthusiasm to boot. This shows that everyone's job in the building is important and makes the bar manager much more accessible—to both bar staff and guests.

Lead Operations

Bar operations refers to everything that needs to happen for the business to run effectively each day. This means the bar manager creates:

  • Bar opening and closing checklists
  • Weekly and monthly cleaning checklists
  • Bartender duties checklists
  • Training materials
  • Order of service (how to greet and sell to guests)
  • Shift changeover guidelines
  • Emergency protocols
  • Employee policies (time off, rules, uniforms)
  • Your full bar liquor list
  • Making sure all the necessary bar equipment and supplies are stocked

These are all collected in a bar operations manual.

Ensure Bar Cleanliness and Safety

A clean bar is a sure-fire way to impress guests. And on the staff side of things, a well-organized bar allows staff to be more efficient. While cleaning the bar and maintaining its top-notch appearance throughout the day is a team effort, the bar manager is responsible for assigning these tasks to staff, creating cleaning schedules, and ensuring all tasks are completed at the end of the day using a bar cleaning checklist.

Conduct Marketing

Getting customers in the door is another big responsibility for bar managers and supervisors. That covers everything from coming up with happy hour ideas to bar promotion ideas to handling the bar’s web and social media presence.

Maintain a Budget

This is where the bar manager’s shrewd business sense shines through. Bar owners set a budget for all of the bar’s expenses. To maintain a profitable bar, bar managers must have all the expenses come in under it. Everything new hire, operational decision, and marketing tactic is viewed through the lens of the budget. A good bar manager maximizes resources, minimizes spending, and comes in under budget.

Build Relationships with Clientele

Regulars are the backbone of a bar business’s success. Not only do they provide revenue that will help the business during slow seasons, they also refer the bar to their friends and bring in new business. That's why it's important to build close relationships with every guest, especially the regulars.If a regular drops in and you know their name, they'll appreciate it. If you know their name and what they order, hoo boy look out. They'll love you for it. And as a bar manager, you can occasionally offer a free drink or discount to keep your regulars happy. It's the small things that show them they're appreciated. And that'll keep them coming back.

Drive Sales

Once their marketing has paid off and people are in the door, the bar manager’s duties don’t end. They’re also responsible for how many drinks are sold and how profitable those drinks are.

After taking and analyzing their beverage inventory, a bar manager knows what drinks are the most profitable and what drinks are the most popular.

Their goal is to make the profitable drinks popular and the popular drinks profitable. The tools at their disposal are menu engineering, up-selling, mixology, and supplier discounts.

How Many Hours Does a Bar Manager Work?

We asked an experienced bar manager in Chicago what their and their peers' schedules looked like. “A bar manager can expect to work about 60 hours a week. That’s five shifts of, on average, 12 hours per day. But some people who get really good at their job are able to cut those down," they said.

So That’s What They Do!

Yep! Sure is. Hopefully you’re more familiar with bar manager duties and responsibilities.

The reason we at BinWise created BinWise Pro is because we believe the most important bar manager responsibility is beverage inventory management.

With our bar inventory management software, bars and restaurants cut down on the time it takes to count inventory. They can also ensure accurate counts every time and immediately generate all of the useful reports that come with consistent inventory taking. Inventory usage, pour cost, par level, and everything needed to make profitable inventory decisions.

Book a demo and we’ll walk you through exactly how we can help.